• Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989. Guidance on Regulations Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989. Guidance on Regulations Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989. Guidance on Regulations
  • Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989. Guidance on Regulations Memorandum of guidance on the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989. Guidance on Regulations
  • Electricity at work Electricity at work Safe working practices. Overview Guidance for devising safe practices for work on, or near, electrical equipment. In addition to assessing broader issues of recognised hazards and safety equipment, the guide has a particular focus on the more detailed decision making matters for consideration, such as whether to work under 'dead' or 'live' conditions and the actions common to both scenarios. Accompanied by guidance, this document steers the reader towards a quick assessment of what's suitable and what's reasonable in most general settings but also provides additional advice concerning more hazardous circumstances, eg extra precautions for high-voltage work. Also containing a typical reference example of a permit to work.
  • Safe use of work equipment. Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 Safe use of work equipment. Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 Approved Code of Practice and Guidance Overview Guidance on the Regulations intended to ensure work equipment should not result in health and safety risks regardless of age, condition or origin. PUWER 98 apply to all such equipment including mobile and lifting devices and all workplaces and situations where the Health and Safety at Work etc Act applies (including certain offshore activities in British territorial waters and on the UK continental shelf). This is addressed to anyone with responsibility (direct or indirect) for equipment and its use (eg employers, employees, self-employed and hirers). With Regulations in full and support from the Approved Code and additional guidance, it is colour-coded to enable
  • Workplace health, safety and welfare. Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 (as amended by the Quarries Miscellaneous Health and Safety Provisions Regulations 1995). Workplace health, safety and welfare. Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 (as amended by the Quarries Miscellaneous Health and Safety Provisions Regulations 1995). Approved Code of Practice and guidance. Overview Guidance on the Regulations, which covers a variety of precise health and safety at work issues. Encompassing the regulatory requirements - applicable to most workplaces - on specific subjects like ventilation, temperature, lighting, cleanliness, room dimensions, workstations and seating, floor conditions, falls or falling objects, transparent and translucent doors, gates and walls, windows, skylights and ventilators, traffic routes, escalators, sanitary conveniences, washing facilities and other matters. Including the Regulations in full, the Approved Code and supplementary guidance.
  • Workplace health, safety and welfareA short guide for managers Workplace health, safety and welfareA short guide for managers
  • Management of health and safety at workManagement of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. Approved Code of Practice and guidance Management of health and safety at workManagement of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999. Approved Code of Practice and guidance Notice of withdrawal Having consulted in accordance with section 16(5) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, and with the consent of the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, the Health and Safety Executive’s approval of the Approved Code of Practice entitled Management of Health and Safety at Work (L21) will cease to have effect on the 31 July 2013. The Code will be withdrawn on that day. The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 remain unchanged. Signed: Secretary to the Health and Safety Executive Board
  • The health and safety toolbox The health and safety toolbox
  • Health and safety made simple - The basics for your business Health and safety made simple - The basics for your business
  • First aid at workYour questions answered First aid at workYour questions answered ome basic questions about first-aid provision at work including: What is first aid at work? What is emergency first aid at work? What do first-aid regulations require of me? First-aid box / kit contents What is a first aider?
  • First aid at workThe Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981. Approved Code of Practice and guidance First aid at workThe Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981. Approved Code of Practice and guidance It provides guidance on: managing the provision of first aid (first-aid kit, equipment, rooms etc) requirements and training for first-aiders requirements for appointed persons making employees aware of first-aid arrangements first aid and the self-employed cases where first-aid regulations do not apply
  • Basic advice on first aid at work Basic advice on first aid at work basic advice on first aid for use in an emergency. It provides a visual step-by-step guide: First aider's priorities in an emergency Checking for a response from a casualty Checking airways and breathing Performing CPR; chest compressions
  • Health and safety law (leaflet) Health and safety law (leaflet)
  • Accident book Accident book Overview Employers and employees can use this book to record details of work-related injuries for which state benefits could be payable. The accident book is also a valuable document that organisations can use to record accident information as part of their management of health and safety. It can be used to record details of injuries from accidents at work that employers must report under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR). Please note that the law changed on 6 April 2012. If a worker sustains an occupational injury resulting from an accident, their injury should be reported if they are incapacitated for more than seven days. There is no longer a requirement to report occupational injuries that result in more than three days of incapacitation, but you must still keep a record of such injuries. It is also available in packs of 20 see ISBN 9780717665440.
  • Reporting accidents and incidents at workA brief gui Reporting accidents and incidents at workA brief gui Reporting accidents and incidents at work A brief guide to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) RIDDOR is the law that requires employers, and anyone else with responsibility for health and safety within a workplace, to report and keep records of: work-related deaths; serious injuries; cases of diagnosed industrial disease; and certain 'dangerous occurrences' (near miss accidents).
  • A guide to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 A guide to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 A guide to the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995
  • Electrical test equipment for use by electricians Electrical test equipment for use by electricians The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 require those in control of all or part of an electrical system to ensure it is safe to use and maintained. This document provides advice and guidance on how to achieve this. It offers advice in the selection and use of: test probes leads lamps voltage indicating devices measuring equipment for circuits with rated voltages not exceeding 650V.
  • Electrical safety and you: A brief guide Electrical safety and you: A brief guide There is also guidance on: the main hazards associated with working with electricity how to carry out a risk assessment how you can reduce risks
  • Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments Maintaining portable electric equipment in low-risk environments

     
HSE and other organisations have produced guidance on electrical safety that is suitable for a wide range of industries and technical competencies
Simple precautions

There are some simple precautions that can be taken that will significantly reduce the risk of electrical injury to you and others around you:

HSE and electrical safety

Under UK law the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 (HSW Act) in Great Britain or the Health and Safety at Work (Northern Ireland) Order 1978 in Northern Ireland employers are responsible for ensuring the safety and health of their employees and also the public, if they are at risk from those work activities. This includes electrical safety.

Electrical Inspectors aim to reduce the number of electrical accidents by enforcing the law, providing advice on good working practices, and developing guidance in response to technical changes in equipment and working methods.